Tuesday, 7 February 2017

Functional food Therapeutic Lifestyle Change Intervention Program Review



Functional food Therapeutic Lifestyle Change Intervention Program Review




A.      Overview: Functional food Therapeutic Lifestyle Change Intervention Program is step by step complementary and Integrated Medicine procedure which includes:

Step 1. Find out the cause of disease: for example  causes for prostatitis, causes for constipation.
Step 2.choose the right functional foods recipe  per patient’s especial  health situation
 Step 3. Designed to provide patients  with the support, knowledge, skills and understanding to enable them to identify and overcome the different challenges faced in the adoption and maintenance of a healthy diet and physically active lifestyle.

B. Functional Foods do have a amazing capability at health improvement.

During the first 50 years of the 20th century, scientific focus was on the identification of essential elements, particularly vitamins, and their role in the prevention of various dietary deficiency diseases. This emphasis on nutrient deficiencies or “undernutrition” shifted dramatically, however, during the 1970s when diseases linked to excess and “overnutrition” became a major public health concern. Thus began a flurry of public health guidelines, including the Senate Select (McGovern) Committee’s Dietary Goals for the United States (1977), the Dietary Guidelines for Americans (1980, 1985, 1990, 1996, 2000— a joint publication of the USDA and the Department of Health and Human Services), the Surgeon General’s Report on Nutrition and Health (1988), the National Research Council’s Diet and Health (1989) and Healthy People 2000 and 2010 from the U.S. Public Health Service. All of these reports are aimed at public policy and education emphasizing the importance of consuming a diet that is low in saturated fat, and high in vegetables, fruits, whole grains and legumes to reduce the risk of chronic diseases such as heart disease, cancer, osteoporosis, diabetes and stroke.
Scientists also began to identify physiologically active components in foods from both plants and animals (known as phytochemicals and zoochemicals, respectively) that potentially could reduce risk for a variety of chronic diseases. These events, coupled with an aging, health-conscious population, changes in food regulations, numerous technological advances and a marketplace ripe for the introduction of health-promoting products, coalesced in the 1990s to create the trend we now know as “functional foods.” This report includes a discussion of how functional foods are currently defined, the strength of the evidence both required and thus far provided for many of these products, safety considerations in using some of these products, factors driving the functional foods phenomenon, and finally, what the future may hold for this new food category.
According to the Department of Health and Human Services, diet plays a role in 5 of 10 of the leading causes of death, including coronary heart disease (CHD), certain types of cancer, stroke, diabetes (noninsulin dependent or type 2) and atherosclerosis. The dietary pattern that has been linked with these major causes of death in the United States and other developed countries is characterized as relatively high in total and saturated fat, cholesterol, sodium and refined sugars and relatively low in unsaturated fat, grains, legumes, fruits and vegetables. An accumulating body of research now suggests that consumption of certain foods or their associated physiologically active components may be linked to disease risk reduction (6). The great majority of these components derive from plants; however, there are several classes of physiologically active functional food ingredients of animal or microbial origin.
Refer: European Journal of Clinical Nutrition (2002) 56, Suppl 3, S29-S33. doi:10.1038/sj.ejcn.1601481

C. lifestyle practices has a more massive influence to our health:

"A very short list of lifestyle practices has a more massive influence on our medical destinies than anything else in all of medicine," says Dr David Katz, director of the Yale University Prevention Research Center and president of the American College of Lifestyle Medicine, in a telephone interview. "There's almost nothing in all of medicine that has the vast, consistent, and diverse evidence base."
He remarked that there is no pill, and there never will be any pill, that can reduce the burden of chronic disease in the way that healthy lifestyle factors can.
So why don't we use lifestyle factors more?
Refer: http://www.medscape.com/